Another Cup of Coffee? Caffeine Addiction Symptoms

Caffeine Addiction Symptoms
  • If that first cup of coffee for the day can’t brew quick enough, and you truly believe you cannot possibly begin the morning without it, you may very well be addicted to caffeine
  • When the relentless need for caffeine is clouding your thoughts and giving you the jitters along with a pounding headache, your physical and mental need for a caffeinated drink is definitely present
  • Most often, a caffeine addiction will begin with a specific reason for continuous consumption. College students, for instance, use caffeine to get through nights of homework overload
  • Since caffeine is a drug addiction in its own realm, stopping the intake of caffeinated products comes with its share of withdrawal symptoms as well


If that first cup of coffee for the day can’t brew quick enough, and you truly believe you cannot possibly begin the morning without it, you may very well be addicted to caffeine. This is especially true if you experience withdrawal symptoms when caffeine is unavailable or when you try your best to avoid it. This scenario describes someone who has become emotionally and mentally dependent on that first brew of many for the day. Whether it is coffee, soda, or other caffeinated products, those who abruptly stop consuming such products will experience withdrawal symptoms if an addiction is genuinely present.

When addicted to caffeine, the symptoms you experience will be a clue to your addiction. Nervousness, increased heart rate, anxiety, headache, heartburn, and more are signs of an overextended caffeine use and the need for more when you don’t have it for a while. As with any drug or alcohol, with addiction comes withdrawal. When the relentless need for caffeine is clouding your thoughts and giving you the jitters along with a pounding headache, your physical and mental need for a caffeinated drink is definitely present. At this point, caffeine addiction symptoms are in full swing.

Most often, a caffeine addiction will begin with a specific reason for continuous consumption. College students, for instance, use caffeine to get through nights of homework overload. Once these students make it through the night with the help of coffee or caffeinated sodas, they find themselves needing more just to stay awake during the very classes which kept them studying all night. The same scenario may hold true for overnight workers such as nightshift hospital staff or factory workers. With continuous consumption with such conditions, addiction may be inevitable.

Caffeine will overstimulate the adrenals. However, with persistent use, the adrenals are eventually weakened with an end result of fatigue. As the vicious cycle continues, more caffeine is consumed. Relaxation and a proper good night sleep are compromised from the overuse of the caffeine.

For many, caffeine has been a lifetime drug. As children, we may consume chocolate candy bars or a cup of hot chocolate after playing outside in the snow on a cold wintery day. Then, the caffeinated sodas become the beverage of choice, especially for young teens. Coffee and tea with caffeine will follow for some teens as well, especially older teenagers. This leads to an adult with a lifelong addiction to caffeine with caffeine addiction symptoms.

Unlike the past, caffeine is now recognized as a drug. With more knowledge of the dangers from overuse of caffeine, more people are taking steps to cut down on the amount of caffeine they consume in a day. Since caffeine is a drug addiction in its own realm, stopping the intake of caffeinated products comes with its share of withdrawal symptoms as well. Such symptoms may include headaches, craving, insomnia, depression, dizziness, nausea, anxiety, and even ringing in the ears. The most common of symptoms is a throbbing, pressure filled headache. The temples, around the eyes, and the back of the head are affected by a caffeine withdrawal headache. One may drink a cup of coffee for such a symptom to disappear. However, more caffeine is hardly the answer. Symptoms of withdrawal will begin within 12 hours of ceasing intake of caffeine. At 24 to 48 hours, symptoms may seem to be at their worst. These symptoms will last up to a week after caffeine products have been discontinued.

To keep the uncomfortable symptoms at bay, cut down on caffeine rather than completely stopping all at once. Herbal teas or decaffeinated colas or coffee are good substitutes for the usual caffeinated drink. Choose herbal teas which have a calming effect to counteract the jitters experienced from skipping that cup of coffee.

This entry was posted on Wednesday, May 6th, 2009 at 4:03 pm and is filed under Nutrition News.

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